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3D Silicon Sensors for radiation monitoring in space

3D Silicon Sensors for radiation monitoring in space

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Sammendrag
The recent revival of space exploration implies an increased interest in space travels that are associated with many challenges and risks, mostly related to the ever-changing adverse space weather. Radiation of any types can be detrimental to both astronauts and the equipment on-board. The capability of monitoring radiation levels reliably in space is therefore becoming a critical aspect for space missions. Many existing radiation monitoring systems are bulky and require operation at high voltages and powers, for example, the Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC). Other systems are often fabricated using off-the-shelf components, including Si diodes for radiation detection, but lack the necessary radiation tolerance to ensure sensor survival throughout the entire mission. The 3D silicon sensor technology provides unique solutions to the limitations of the existing technologies for radiation monitoring in space. This new technology was introduced to mitigate the effects of radiation damage in High Energy Physics Experiments. Through state-of-the-art micro-machining, 3D technology decouples the inter-electrode spacing from the thickness of the silicon sensor. Columnar electrodes are etched through the silicon bulk, allowing for inter-electrode spacing that is independent of the bulk thickness. The reduction in electrode spacing results in ultra-low operating voltage (<10 V), fast sensor response (< 1ns), and increased radiation hardness. 3D silicon pixel sensors were fabricated for the ATLAS experiment at CERN, and operation up to fluences in excess of 1x1016 neq/cm-2 was demonstrated. Design, fabrication, and testing of a novel 3D silicon sensors tailored to space applications and manufactured at SINTEF MiNaLab are here reported. Electrical characteristics and sensor response to radioactive sources will be presented. Further tests plans will be discussed together with a development plan aiming at a portable, real-time on-line micro-dosimeter for space applications realised in collaboration with the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics at the University of Wollongong, Australia.
Språk
Engelsk
Forfatter(e)
Institusjon(er)
  • SINTEF Digital / Microsystems and Nanotechnology
Presentert på
SPACEMON 2017
Sted
Noordwijk
Dato
12.12.2017 - 14.12.2017
År
2017