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Quantifying the efficacy of aircraft noise regulation

Abstract

Protecting residential populations from exposure to highly annoying transportation noise is a common goal of national noise regulatory policies. Agencies which define and regulate "acceptable" levels of transportation noise often justify their policies with reference to a dosage-response relationship for noise-induced annoyance. This relationship converts levels of cumulative noise exposure - including a noise exposure level that an agency considers "acceptable" - into predicted annoyance prevalence rates in a hypothetical, nominally average community. Because the prevalence of annoyance for the same transportation noise exposure varies over a range in excess of 30 dB from one community to the next, however, a "one-size-fits-all" national policy can greatly under- or over-predict the prevalence of annoyance in many actual communities. Recent advances in understanding of community-specific response to transportation noise permit quantitative estimates to be made of the efficacy of regulatory policies in protecting all communities from annoyance produced by transportation noise.




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Category

Academic chapter/article/Conference paper

Language

English

Author(s)

Affiliation

  • Diverse norske bedrifter og organisasjoner
  • Unknown
  • SINTEF Digital / Connectivity Technologies and Platforms

Year

2012

Publisher

Curran Associates, Inc.

Book

Proceedings of Inter-Noise 2012 : held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Noise Control and Acoustics Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers ; New York, New York, USA, August 19 - 22, 2012

ISBN

9781627485609

Page(s)

5341 - 5345

View this publication at Cristin