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Observations of Rising Methane Bubbles in Trondheimsfjord and Its Implications to Gas Dissolution

Abstract

Gas dissolution reduces the release of methane to the atmosphere from subsea sources. Being
able to predict and assess the methane flux to the atmosphere requires knowledge on gas dissolution and
mass transfer. This can be obtained by studying the size evolution of bubbles rising in water. New data of
bubble size evolution have been obtained by releasing, tracking, and filming methane bubbles with an ROV
in the Trondheimsfjord from depths varying between 100 and 300 m. Released bubbles had an initial
diameter between 5 and 7 mm and were tracked until they reached a diameter of roughly 2 mm. The new
data were compared against theory, applying established correlations for the mass transfer coefficient. There
was an inconsistency between experiment and theory. Thus, new correlations for the mass transfer are
proposed. The new correlations are consistent with both the new experiments and previously published
experiments. They indicate that the conditions in the ocean can be labeled as partly contaminated with
respect to mass transfer.

Category

Academic article

Language

English

Affiliation

  • SINTEF Industry / Process Technology
  • SINTEF Ocean / Climate and Environment

Year

2019

Published in

Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR): Oceans

ISSN

2169-9275

Publisher

American Geophysical Union (AGU)

Volume

124

Issue

3

Page(s)

1399 - 1409

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