To main content

Local perceptions of opportunities for engagement and procedural justice in electricity transmission grid projects in Norway and the UK

Abstract

Transmission lines are critical infrastructures, but frequently contested especially at the local level, bylocal communities. The role of public engagement in processes pertaining to specific transmission lineprojects is an under-researched, yet important topic that this paper seeks to discuss by investigating howinhabitants perceive these processes and to what extent they find the processes just and fair. This paperaddresses the participatory aspects of the planning process, as perceived by the local inhabitants in fourNorway and UK cases, by using a qualitative comparative case study design. We further analyse this issuethrough frameworks of public engagement and procedural justice. In both countries public engagement islargely characterized by perceptions of insufficient information, and insufficient influence on the process.In sum, the findings indicate that the informants generally perceive the opportunities for involvementas insufficient and unjust. The findings are quite similar across all cases and both countries. Local inhab-itants represent diverse groups who often have different levels of knowledge, time and engagement tobring to the planning process. Their requests for improved processes thus underline the serious publicengagement challenges that applicants and decision-makers face. Sustainable grid development Involvement Public engagement Communication Consultation Participation Procedural justice © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Category

Academic article

Client

  • Research Council of Norway (RCN) / 207774

Language

English

Author(s)

  • Jørgen Kjetil Knudsen
  • Line Camilla Wold
  • Øystein Aas
  • Jens Jacob Kielland Haug
  • Susanna Batel
  • Patrick Devine-Wright
  • Marte Qvenild
  • Gerd Blindheim Jacobsen

Affiliation

  • SINTEF Energy Research / Termisk energi
  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
  • University of Exeter

Year

2015

Published in

Land Use Policy

ISSN

0264-8377

Publisher

Elsevier

Volume

48

Page(s)

299 - 308

View this publication at Cristin