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SalmonInsight

SalmonInsight

SalmonInsight shall provide new knowledge and technology to improve welfare and reduce stress in salmon production.

Goal

SalmonInsight is a four-year research project and the main goal of the project is to provide new knowledge on how physiology and stress in salmon is reflected in observable behavioural expressions. This will form a foundation for developing future solutions for online monitoring of salmon in sea-cages during production.

The total mortality rate through a grow-out phase in Atlantic salmon farming may be up to 19%. This is unacceptable, as high mortalities may mean that the fish are suffering during production in addition to being a large economic cost for salmon farmers.

The first step in improving this situation is to monitor the physiology and stress of salmon during demanding operations (e.g. crowding) and under normal production to identify under which conditions the fish exhibit increased stress levels. Developing technologies for obtaining such data requires knowledge on how the physiology and stress of salmon is reflected in data possible to monitor online using state-of-the-art sensors.

SalmonInsight will seek to answer these questions through laboratory experiments where fish are subjected to e.g. simulated crowding operations and conditions resembling life in a cage under normal operation. In these experiments, physiological data will be collected simultaneously with data possible to obtain in real time in sea-cages using state-of-the-art sensors. The data will be used to develop new solutions for online monitoring of stress and physiology in sea-cages that will be verified in a field study in a commercial cage.

Partners

The project partners in SalmonInsight are world leading in their respective fields, and will collaborate to provide new knowledge and technology that will improve welfare and reduce stress in salmon production.

Published 17 December 2018
Senior Research Scientist

Project duration

2018 - 2022

Budget: 10 mill NOK
Financed by the Research Council of Norway