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Two Leading Research Papers Share NCCS Award

The Scientific Committee of the Norwegian CCS Research Centre (NCCS) recently announced joint winners of the Best NCCS Paper award for 2019. The award aims to highlight world-leading research in carbon capture, transport and storage technologies from the NCCS research centre.

The two winning papers are:

Techno-economic analyses of CO2 liquefaction: Impact of product pressure and impurities, by Han Deng, Simon Roussanaly & Geir Skaugen was published in the International Journal of Refrigeration, 103, 301-315.

Demonstrating the potential of CO2 hydrate self-sealing in Svalbard, Arctic Norway, by Stian Almenningen, Peter Betlem, Arif Hussain, Srikumar Roy, Kim Senger & Geir Ersland was published in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 89, 1-8.

The award winner is chosen by the NCCS Scientific Committee. Chair Philip Ringrose congratulated both winners: "All six shortlisted papers have clear potential to make an impact in their field of application. However, these two were clear front-runners, as they demonstrated both research insights and potential value for broader application."

Here is some more information about the winning papers:

Techno-economic analyses of CO2 liquefaction: Impact of product pressure and impurities

This paper which focuses on CO2 liquefaction is the first part of an effort aiming at identifying optimal conditions (pressure, temperature and composition) for the transport of CO2 by ship. This study investigates the impact of the post-liquefaction delivery pressure, i.e. the target transport conditions, on the design and cost of CO2 liquefaction process prior to ship transport. For pure CO2, the highest liquefaction cost occurs for the lowest pressure case (7 bar), and this cost increases when potential impurity scenarios are considered. Consequently, potential impurities present in the CO2 stream after capture and purity requirements after the liquefaction process also have a significant impact on cost comparisons for different delivery pressure scenarios. This study is a key step toward confidently determining optimal transport conditions for the shipping part of the CCS value chain.

Demonstrating the potential of CO2 hydrate self-sealing in Svalbard, Arctic Norway

The potential self-sealing properties of CO2 hydrate are demonstrated at realistic reservoir conditions using samples from the Longyearbyen CO2 Lab in Svalbard, Arctic Norway. The work demonstrates the potential of CO2 hydrate formation as a secondary seal in settings with favourable CO2 hydrate formation conditions in or above the reservoir. The results indicate that the self-sealing nature of CO2 hydrate should be considered while characterizing carbon sequestration reservoirs in both marine and permafrost-affected settings, and may provide an important contribution to storage safety assessments.

Published 03 August 2020
Senior Research Scientist
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Porject duration:

01/08/2016 - 23/02/2024