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Genetic variation may explain why females are less susceptible to dental erosion

Genetic variation may explain why females are less susceptible to dental erosion

Category
Journal publication
Abstract
Not all individuals at risk for dental erosion (DE) display erosive lesions. The prevalence of DE is higher among male subjects. The occurrence of DE may depend on more than just acidic challenge, with genetics possibly playing a role. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of enamel-formation genes with DE. One premolar and a saliva sample were collected from 90 individuals. Prepared teeth were immersed in 0.01 M HCl (pH 2.2), and enamel loss (μm) was measured using white light interferometry. DNA was extracted from saliva, and 15 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were analysed. Allele and genotype frequencies were related to the enamel loss of the specimens. Single-marker and haplotype analyses were performed using sex as a covariate. Mean enamel loss was higher for male donors than for female donors (P = 0.047). Significant associations were found between enamel loss and amelogenin, X-linked (AMELX), tuftelin 1 (TUFT1), and tuftelin-interacting protein 11 (TFIP11). Analyses showed significant associations between variation in enamel-formation genes and a lower susceptibility to DE in female subjects. The results indicate that susceptibility to DE is influenced by genetic variation, and may, in part, explain why some individuals are more susceptible than others to DE, including differences between female subjects and male subjects.
Language
English
Author(s)
  • Uhlen Marte-Mari Nordsetmoen
  • Stenhagen Kjersti Refsholt
  • Dizak Piper M.
  • Holme Børge
  • Mulic Aida
  • Tveit Anne Bjørg
  • Vieira Alexandre R.
Affiliation
  • University of Oslo
  • University of Pittsburgh
  • SINTEF Industry / Materials and Nanotechnology
Year
2016
Published in
European Journal of Oral Sciences
ISSN
0909-8836
Volume
124
Issue
5
Page(s)
426 - 432