Energy Efficient Drainage - SP7

Research Scientist
480 44 041

This subproject analyses the energy use for different reservoir drainage strategies. Potential reductions in energy use will be identified, both for implementation on short time scales in mature fields, and on longer time scales for new field developments. The work is performed in close cooperation with industry partners.

Main objective

Assess and quantify energy use coupled to subsurface flow processes for relevant drainage strategies and identify potential for energy reduction while maintaining focus on maximising oil and gas recovery. Focus in 2020 has been on:

  • identifying potential technologies and strategies for reduced energy production
  • screening and preparing models for evaluating drainage strategies to quantify energy use and reduction potential
  • developing an optimisation framework to enable maximised oil and gas recovery combined with reduced energy needs and costs.

Results 2020

  • Presented an overview of candidate technologies for reduced energy use related to drainage.
  • Created models for simulating effect of inflow devices in wells for reduced energy use associated with water production.
  • Prepared modified subsurface models of the Norne field and the Norne E-segment. The models will be used for studying water-based drainage strategies. The simulation models were tested in commercial and open-source simulators, and the modified Norne model was used in a case study for SP6.
  • A methodology for joint optimisation of oil and gas production and CO2 emissions was developed through coupling of reservoir, subsurface and topside models. Optimisation is implemented in the open-source software FieldOpt (NTNU).
  • A prototype for visualisation of energy dissipation in the reservoir was developed.

Expected innovations are:

  • Assessment methodology for energy consumption for relevant drainage strategies
  • Methodology for co-optimisation of oil and gas production, energy use and costs
  • Guidelines for selecting energy efficient drainage strategies.
Capillary pressure, caused by interfacial tension (IFT) between reservoir fluids is the most basic rock-fluid property in multiphase flow. Image of high pressure, high temperature, pendant drop IFT measurement cell.
Capillary pressure, caused by interfacial tension (IFT) between reservoir fluids is the most basic rock-fluid property in multiphase flow. Image of high pressure, high temperature, pendant drop IFT measurement cell.

Results 2019

This SP analyses the energy use for different reservoir drainage strategies. Potential reductions in energy use will be identified,  both for implementation on short time scales  in mature fields, and on longer time scales for new field developments. The work is performed in close cooperation with industry partners.

Main objective

Reduce the energy use related to subsurface flow processes. Assess and compare drainage strategies to reduce energy needs while maintaining focus on oil and gas recovery.

  • Assess drainage strategies to quantify energy use related to reservoir flow and identify potential reductions
  • Develop optimization framework to enable maximized oil and gas recovery combined with reduced energy needs and costs.

Main results

  • Industry meetings to get feedback on project plans and to request data and models.
  • Scope of work and detailed work plan for the first two years defined.
  • Collection and screening of generic models to be used in the SP.
  • Modified Norne field model selected for field case studies (figure).
  • Announcement and selection of the first PhD candidate. The PhD will focus on developing a framework for co-optimization of energy use and hydrocarbon recovery.

Impact and innovations

Expected innovations are:

  • Assessment methodology for energy consumption for relevant drainage strategies
  • Methodology for co-optimization of oil and gas production, energy use and costs
  • Guidelines for selecting energy efficient drainage strategies.
Norne Field model, made available by The Open Porous Media Initiative (OPM).